What Are Your Hands Saying?

We joke a lot about people talking with their hands, but actually, hands do a lot of talking on their own. This was pointed out to me many years ago by Calling All Girls magazine, also known at various times as Compact, or Young Miss magazine. It began publication in the 1930’s and taught generations of pre-teen and teen girls how to become well-mannered and well-groomed young ladies. Its final issue appeared in 2004.

For some reason, one particular article has always stayed in my mind. “What Are Your Hands Saying About You?” the title asked. It’s true that hands do reveal a lot of information, and we very often do judge people by their hands.

The article, of course, went on to teach the importance of cleanliness, provided tips for care of the nails, and finished with instructions on doing a proper manicure. I suppose one reason that article stuck in my head was because I was a young pianist and that meant always keeping my fingernails trimmed. Each time I looked at my hands I thought, “Well, my hands are saying that I play the piano.”

Along with feet, hands are probably the most hated body part when it comes to drawing. I’ve read comments from art instructors who tell of students whose figure drawings always show people posed with their hands behind their backs. I can relate.

Turkey Hand 2My first attempts at drawing hands were “turkey hands”. Remember how in grade school we traced our hands and turned them into turkeys for Thanksgiving?

You can barely see the sketch, I know. Even trying to darken it a bit with photo-editing didn’t change what this hand was saying about me. It’s clearly telling everyone that I was afraid of trying, afraid I would never learn to draw a hand — or anything else. I felt like I was cheating a bit by tracing my hand, so I barely touched the pencil to the paper.

1st Observed HandOf course, I kept on learning more about drawing skills, and eventually I drew my hand again, this time from observation alone. I have no idea why I drew the right hand instead of the left, but as before, this hand has a lot to say. It says that I’m getting bolder and making heavier marks. It also says that I was starting to learn a little about shading. The fingers are misshapen and out of proportion a bit, but this hand said, “Hey, you’re making progress.”

An Early Hand DrawingI continued drawing hands. Some were better than others. I practiced drawing hands in various poses. This one caught my husband’s attention. “Did you draw that hand?” he asked.

Yes, I drew this hand with its woefully skinny little thumb and its rather fat index finger, but for some reason it impressed my husband. I’d been learning to draw for about six weeks, and this hand was pointing the way ahead, saying, “Keep going. You can do this.”

As much as possible though, I’ve avoided drawing hands. I understand the basic principles behind them, how to identify the individual shapes that make up the human hand — square, triangle, cylinders — and I’ve learned more about proportions. In studying anatomy, I’ve been drawing the bones of the hands, too. I think that’s helping me.

FIgure Drawing HandsStill, drawing hands on figures has been hard. When I enrolled in the free Craftsy class on figure drawing, I definitely had problems getting the hands right.

The hand on his knee isn’t too awful, but I more or less gave up trying when it came to the hand holding that rod. It was too much to even think about. I sketched in a few lines to represent his fingers, but that was the best I could do.

Since then, I’ve been practicing my hands even more, drawing more different poses, more different gestures.

One thing about drawing hands — we always have one with us, so it’s the perfect subject for quick sketches.

Hand DownHere’s one of my more recent hand drawings. What it says is that I’m getting a bit more comfortable with drawing hands, a bit more relaxed.

Recent Hand PosesAnother recent sketch says I’m getting more confident, more sure of myself when drawing hands.

But the true test, I knew, would be going back and giving that Craftsy fellow the hand a hero deserves. That was my project this morning, and I like what this hand has to say — not so much about the model but about me as an artist. It speaks of the value of persistence and proclaims that I have, indeed, come a long way since last summer. Today's Hero

The hands I’m drawing now are not perfect by any means, but they are hands that look human, hands that are more proportionately correct, hands that represent hard work and determination.

I like what these hands have to say about my journey.

Advertisements

About Judith

Author, artist, and an independent consultant for Perfectly Posh. I enjoy sharing my thoughts and interests through blogging and invite you to visit my sites.

130 comments

  1. Look at you go!!! Awesome Judith!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. keep going, i love the hands, they do say so much –

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hands (and feet) are always the toughest to draw. Some of my friends who wanted to be artists gave up early because they could’t get it right the first couple of tries. I like how you didn’t give up and instead took it as a challenge. Now here you are showing the world your art. Keep going!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Your hand drawings look great! I just don’t know that I could ever draw a realistic looking hand.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. This is awesome, Judith! Well written from your heart and yes, your pictures reflect growth! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  6. You are making great progress with your hand studies. I find hands very hard. They tend to look like bunches of bananas or a cluster of sausages. What helps me is to draw lines first as if those are the bones I can draw the flesh over. That helps me get the proportions and angles right before I add shape and form into the mix. Hands and feet, however, remain my nemesis.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thinking about the bone structure beneath the hands has definitely helped me. I’m really struggling though with hands — or other body parts — in extreme positions. I understand the principles of foreshortening, but it’s difficult for me to achieve good results in my drawings. But I’m only beginning. By this time next year, maybe I can show off some nicely foreshortened figures. 🙂 Alongside the wonky-looking ones I’m drawing now LOL

      Liked by 1 person

  7. dawnmarie

    I loved drawing those turkey hands as a kid. I liked your descriptions about what the hand says…timid to keep going to confident. It is the same with our paintings. Timid and unsure to confidence when we quit being afraid of mistakes. Fear is a funny thing. We can let it discourage us and paralyze us or we can try and try again and tell the fear to go suck rocks. Take that timidity!

    Liked by 2 people

  8. You’re making great progress, Judith! I used to draw my thumb only. I’ve always worked small, my first sketchbook was smaller than an index card lol! So a thumb was good. I’ve done my feet many times, not sure if I’ve tried my whole hand recently at all. But you’re inspiring me to do it! Bravo, you! I really enjoyed reading your story and I hope others read this and learn that there is no art fairy that drops art talent in a box for us to find. My early bird drawings are so pathetic but they spurred me on. (I started by wanting to draw a seagull in flight, just a simple silhouette for a series of art quilts I wanted to design. This is why I even took up art in the first place.). Oh, I got so frustrated but I dug my heels in. Anyway I’m impressed with your growth here. The sky is the limit! For you, for me, for us all. I think the key difference is that you and I believe it. Some say they can’t draw, they’ll never be able to draw. And I think that’s true for them, if they believe it. You GO! I look forward to seeing what you discover daily.

    Liked by 2 people

    • dawnmarie

      That is exactly right. People say they can not paint. I don’t believe that for a second. You have to do it and keep doing it. It takes more desire than anything. Now I do believe people don’t have the desire to paint, but that is not the same as not being able to. You are right, there is no magic fairy. It takes work and practice. Just like anything else in life. If you want to paint or draw, time and practice will see to it that you can. If you don’t want to put the time in, then no, you won’t learn the skill.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Amen, Dawn, and can I say amen again. Thank you.

        Liked by 2 people

      • You’re right. A lot of people just don’t want to make the effort. They say they can’t draw, but they’re really saying they don’t actually want to bother trying.

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        Yes. I also think people want it to be easy. They want to sit down and make a master piece right off the bat and if they don’t, they give up. Same with math.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Same with almost everything, don’t you think? Yet the best part of learning is the process, not the result. People who give up because they want immediate perfection end up missing out on everything.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I have to admit, I’m not crazy about the process. Or the journey. Or any of those words. I just want to be able to DO it. I have something to say and I want to say it. And say it pretty! I would very much like to press the skip button that gets me to the end, where I’m making really amazing stuff. Just keeping it real as they say.

        Liked by 2 people

      • I’ve felt those same feelings. I talk about that in a post I have coming up. It’s called “At the Edge”. I don’t remember what day it’s going to post. I think it might be on Wednesday.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Ok you are way organized. I paint every day and post it that night. I paint and post both usually that night and posts in the am. I can’t imagine having stuff scheduled in advance. Wowza!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I have so many thoughts I want to share that they just keep coming out. So I write the posts and get them scheduled. Of course, things change…like Carsen coming over and painting his rainbow — so then I have to go in and do a little rescheduling. I like staying a few days ahead, that way if something happens that I can’t post one morning, something will still be ready.

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        Some times I just want the result too Laura. I want amazing stuff!

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        It is the American way. Instant gratification.

        Liked by 2 people

      • I think what I’m most grateful for in art is the fact that it has helped me develop a little more patience. That’s a good thing to have.

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        Absolutely! It is helping my perfectionist tendencies also.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m glad to say that my perfectionist tendencies haven’t messed with my mind where art is concerned. When I started drawing, I expected to fail, so perfection wasn’t even a consideration. I was happy to get marks on the page that in any way, shape, or form resembled the subject I was drawing. My standards were so low that nothing registered on my “need to be perfect” scale. Thank goodness for that, or I’d still be struggling and obsessing over my first drawing.

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        I used to over work my paintings badly! I struggle to just let the stroke be.

        Liked by 2 people

      • With watercolors, I find it hard to know when to stop messing with it. It’s not so much because I want to make it perfect but because I feel my paintings are too simple, that they need more. And the more I try to add, the worse they look LOL

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        I never tried working with “runny water colors”. I would use barely any water. Just enough to get the paint to go on. I think working with wet color would make me crazy! You know, there is beauty in simplicity.

        Liked by 2 people

      • I’ve been sort of the opposite, always using too much water, and I’ve got to break that habit now with acrylics. I’m always wanting to dip my brush in “just a little water to smooth it out”, and I can see that I really shouldn’t be doing that all the time. That’s one reason why working on the more details paintings — like the portraits and the feet LOL — have helped me. I can’t let the paint get too runny on those or I’ll ruin the whole thing.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        Makes total sense to me. I think you are really gonna like acrylics.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’ve got a painting started but so far all I have finished is the background, and it came out way too dark. Live and learn, right? My husband is going to be home all week, so I don’t know how much painting I’ll get done, but I do want to work on it a little. And when my post on acrylics publishes — Tuesday — please jump in with any advice or suggestions about materials. Painting on canvas is really different, but I think I will enjoy it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        Acrylics darken when they dry…yup. The filler dries to clear so the pigment is no longer…mixed in white. My sister complains about that…it doesn’t bother me because I always want darker, but it really bugs her.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Exactly the opposite of watercolors. I think I will like that a lot!

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        Must be my artistic emotional bleakness that makes me appreciate the darkening of acrylics. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sometimes with watercolors, a color will dry so light I’ll wonder if it’s even painted. I feel like “Well, gee, that was a waste of time.” It will be nice to look at a painting and see that I’ve actually accomplished putting some color on the paper.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        That was part of my issue with water color. I wanted bold and bright and when I used an entire tray of red on a poopy to get it as dark as I wanted, I said…there has got to be something bolder for me!

        Liked by 1 person

      • LOL, Dawn, sorry, I have to laugh, and when I make typos, please do the same. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        I like to paint acrylics with Cinnamon the art Sherpa. She is crazy but she is fun and her paint along paintings are simple and fun too. She gives good pointers as you go along.

        Liked by 2 people

      • I will check her out! Oh, I see You Tube videos! Great. Thank you so much.

        Liked by 2 people

    • I get so frustrated now when people tell me they can’t draw. “Neither could I!” I tell them. I try to explain that it is possible to learn. So many people, though, are stuck with that belief that they can’t learn to draw. They’re missing out on so much. That’s why I started this blog. I want people to SEE that it’s a learned skill. I want my progress to encourage others to give art a try.

      Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        I think there is this weird idea out there that God only gave the elite few the art gene. Nope. I think He gave it to all of us because He made us like Him and He is the Master Artist. I firmly believe that. And…if you don’t believe that, then believe that everything takes practice and anything worth learning takes time.

        Liked by 2 people

      • So much does come down to desire. Add a little determination to it, and put in the time it takes to develop proficiency, and anyone can learn to draw or paint…or dance, or sculpt, or write or compose, or play the guitar. Creativity is a gift we’re given. I want to help others learn to recognize it and use it.

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        Yes! It is called life. Live and learn.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dawn I agree with you completely in this. We were made in His image and we were made to be creators. I believe that when we don’t create in some form or fashion, we become ill. Physically, mentally, or both but we invite illness when we don’t create. Your thoughts?

        Liked by 2 people

      • I am glad that art and music are being used more as “therapies” in the healing process. We are meant to be creative. I agree completely with you, Laura. When we don’t express ourselves, of course we cause illness and dis-ease in our minds and bodies.

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        I would definitely agree with that. I wish I had something more to say about it that would be deep and mind blowing, but I think it is pretty simple. Yet, I think you can still be the most creative person in the world and still be unfulfilled, stale, sick and depressed because there is a hole in each of us that can not be fulfilled with anything we do. Something else has to fill it and it does not come from us. It is…other.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Could it be a sense of connection? Not so much with others or with the world, but a sense of being connected to something higher or greater? Something like mas alla in Spanish? I guess I’m trying to say a sort of connection to the divine. Sometimes it finds us…but how do we find it?

        Like

      • dawnmarie

        Yes. That is what I am trying to say. If you don’t acknowledge the one who loves and made you how can you ever be truly fulfilled. You can’t. Works never completed anyone.

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        Seek and you shall find. Knock, and the door will be opened to you.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Right. Don’t sit there doing nothing and expect to ever find what you’re meant to be.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        Yes…and seek Him first. The rest will come as is fit for you.

        Liked by 2 people

      • There is a song called “First” and I think it’s by Lauren Daigle? It’s a great song. Your comment made me think of it immediately. 💚

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        I just listened to it. Brought more than one tear to my eye. Thank you so much for that.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Trust in You is also good, by her. I listen to the Francesca Battistelli station on Pandora. It gives energy when energy is gone lol. Glad you enjoyed it.

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        I did enjoy it and I like the gruffness in her voice. I will check out more on Pandora as you suggested. I have a hard time with that because I feel like so many singers these days fall into that genre because they don’t make it in other genres and I get sad to see that there was never any sincerity and though I know the songs should be about how I feel, I let the motives of the singer get in the way.

        Liked by 2 people

      • I hear you but I just love the artists I’m finding out there in that area at this time. Maybe before it was different but I’m finding lots of heart and passion and talent, huge talent out there too. I hope you like.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Most of my Pandora stations are either classical or “space music”…well, no, that’s not true. I’ve got a little of everything. Acadian, Cajun, Zydeco, Latin, folk, early music from the Renaissance. Follows are welcome if you want to check out my bizarre tastes in music! (Yes, the link has a different name, but it’s still me.)

        http://www.pandora.com/profile/kcchristinacole

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        My station is a mess! I don’t even know what is on there.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, great song! I hit enter too soon on the last reply.

        Liked by 2 people

      • She is great and so is Francesca Battistelli, Judith if you’re into Pandora. Her station is great. Anytime I’m down or tired that kind of music really rescues me every time.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Yes, I’m on Pandora. In fact, there’s a link to one of my stations in tomorrow’s post.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Yes! Amen and amen! It’s a big part of the reason I got started in January 2015 blogging. But some people, you will never convince. They can’t draw. They can paint, but can’t draw. Or they can do neither one. And whatever they think is true for them. We will try and convince them tho and I say bravo to you for trying. I hope you do convince them. I was able to convince a couple of people with draw a bird day monthly celebrations. Which was a big part of the reason I started doing that. I only wanted to paint in WC. I never wanted to draw because I thought I was bad at it. Which I was. I wanted to skip drawing and go to painting. But I could see that I was never going to be able to paint well if I was painting on top of a bad drawing. So I went back to drawing and I guess I had learned enough about art by painting (badly, but who cares) that I was better at drawing when I went back to it. And then I just started experimenting with different supplies and I’ve learned a lot by figuring out how to use them. Idk we all have to find our own way. But I hope you inspire people to learn how to draw. I really do. Because what could be better than something that you can take with you anywhere and all you need is a little piece of paper and a pencil. Don’t even need water! It’s great! And if you want to be a painter, IMO you’ll be a much better one if you learn to draw.

        Liked by 2 people

      • When I decided to learn to draw, it wasn’t so much that I wanted to learn how to use graphite. I didn’t see “Drawing” as a particular pencil-based skill. To me it was simply a foundation for anything I might want to do in art. From the start, I wanted to learn to paint, and I assumed that I couldn’t learn to paint unless I knew how to draw. I’ve since learned that’s not necessarily true. A lot of painters skip over the “learning to draw” part, and if it works for them, that’s great, I guess. For me, I’m very glad I’ve learned the basics of drawing. I think it gives me a solid foundation for ever medium I want to try.

        Liked by 2 people

      • dawnmarie

        Van Gogh would agree with you. He thought you must draw before you paint. I laugh when people say he couldn’t draw….oh yes he could!!! They just haven’t seen his drawings. I also laugh when they say he couldn’t paint either….Lolololol….he chose to paint the way he did. It was his style. He could paint realistically, he just didn’t.

        Liked by 2 people

      • I saw some of his realistic drawings at an exhibit in St. Louis. Yes, he could definitely draw. He’s going to be the subject of a post I’m doing later this month.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        I have read so much about him but from other people’s perspectives and honestly, I think the only way to kinda know what he thought and felt is by reading his letters, which I have not done. I don’t think he was the crazy man everyone said he was. I think he was trying to live in a world that he knew wasn’t his the best way he knew how and he left beautiful evidence that he was here. I love that he was a rebel and that he didn’t follow all the other artists. Honestly, I look at lots of paintings and think….meh. They all look alike. All the Renaissance stuff…I can appreciate the amount of work that went into them, but they seem dead to me.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I love Van Gogh’s colors and the thickness of the paints. I’ve seen documentaries about him and read theories about illnesses affecting his mind and perception. I don’t really care about all the life history. I know him through his work. He knew what he wanted to paint, and he did it in his own way. That’s a true artist.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        So many theories. I remember in pharmacy school talking about the halos around his stuff and how it must have been from digoxin toxicity and the crazy colors had to be because of absynth. Maybe, maybe not. I doubt it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • In my eyes, it doesn’t matter. I love what he put on the canvas, for whatever reason.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        There is one I do not like at all. Mint is so creepy. Mi think it is called two children. You think there are demons in your green?

        Like

      • dawnmarie

        Autocorrect! Ugh.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hey, mint IS creepy! It’s crept all over the garden where I used to have my herbs. That’s why I have my herbs in big planters on the porch now. Bad, bad mint!

        Like

      • dawnmarie

        Mint is way creepy! How the chives have survived living amongst it, I have no idea. Should have been choked out long ago.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yeah, my chives are the only thing other than mint that is still surviving in my old herb garden. They’re thriving!

        Liked by 1 person

      • LOL, yeah, good one. To me, the faces look adult…it’s like grown up people in children’s bodies, and yes, that’s creepy.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        Yes! And those eyes are so flat and dead.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Those two children do give me the creeps. At the same time, there’s this weird fascination there, trying to get into Van Gogh’s head and wondering what was he thinking? It’s the same way I feel when I hear Bruckner’s 5th symphony.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        Yes! I want to know what was in his head. I know he was sad and I know he longed for the heavens…he didn’t kill himself. I don’t believe that. He might have wanted to die and said as much, but he didn’t do it. He painted a painting a day the last few months of his life, like he knew time was short…or maybe he was just manic. I don’t know. But I would like to pick his brain.

        Liked by 1 person

      • There’s a touching little movie — a comedy — about Van Gogh returning to earth. Have you seen it? I think the title might be “Starry Night”.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        No! I will have to find that! I hope they have accents but no sub titles.

        Like

      • It’s all English. A silly little comedy really, but it’s touching, too. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0212537/

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        As in cool English accents? I love British Comedy.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Nope. California. It’s really a cheesy little comedy with bad acting and lousy reviews, but my Van Gogh loving daughter and I think it’s fun. Yet it’s sad, too, at the end.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        Sold!

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        That man could paint some seriously awesome shoes! I love his shoe paintings.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes! Mind-bogglingly awesome. I always think of my grandfather’s shoes when I see Van Gogh’s shoes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        I love them!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I love his irises more than anything. The colors are so stunning. My favorite colors, too. I guess that influences how I feel. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        His irises are what encouraged me to start painting. I think my third oil painting on canvas paper was when I finally tried irises. I should post that on. But it is behind glass, so the glare is hard to deal with in a photograph.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sounds like it came out really good. If I’m able to frame my third oil painting — when I ever get around to trying oils — I’ll be doing a real happy dance!

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        I like it, but I know everyone has their own taste. I will post it soon. I think it was done around 2000? I can’t remember exactly when I started painting. I was when I first got sick with Graves and was on leave from work for a while. I could barely hold a brush my hands shook so bad.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Wow! I didn’t know that part of your painting story. What a challenge for you to face.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        I suppose. The shaking goes away when my thyroid is normal. I don’t have one, so meds. Meh.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I think there’s a lot wrong with our medical system, but thank goodness there are medications that help people deal with health conditions. I hope you’re able to keep the situation under control without a lot of problems.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        Well enough. I know there is a place for medicine. Unfortunately, when profit is at the center, people get hurt. We forget that medicine covers and controls symptoms,but provides no cure. After all, it is poison. 😀 and while there is a place for it, there is also a place where it should not be. I feel like we create diseases to use our drugs for….and we keep making the same drugs over and over so we have something to sell and we can’t come up with anything better. Oh goodness. I will stop now. I could go on all day. I will stop though.

        Liked by 1 person

      • My problem with the medical system is that it’s set up so that doctors make money when people are sick, not when they’re well. Enough said.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie

        And what better way to make people sick than by telling them they are and by treating things as disease that are perfectly normal. Okay. No more. I am shutting up!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m all for natural healing as far as possible. Nature is wondrous!

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Practice really makes progress. Thank you for sharing your lovely story. Truly an inspiration for beginners like me.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Judith I always enjoy reading your posts and seeing what you are tackling and trying to solve….hands and feet are so hard! and for some reason attaching them to the legs and arms are even more so. Wow, you go and get ’em girl! It takes throwing yourself into the task to get it clear and happening in the brain and then through the implement. It is happening as you keep at it. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Margaret. I really, really am enjoying my art anatomy. I spent part of the morning drawing clavicles and scapulas, and identifying the different parts — anterior and posterior views — and I know how boring it sounds to others, but I am fascinated by it. I hope drawing all these bones and muscles will help me with figure drawing.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I studied anatomy in college and I am very interested in it. Have you considered finding a figure drawing group? You learn loads by drawing from a model. Drawing the muscles and bones will help you to mentally and connect to the figure, part of the puzzle. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • We live so far away from the city that drawing with a group would be really difficult for me to manage. I’ve been using online atelier sites which I know isn’t quite the same. I don’t see how those models hold some of those weird poses though. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • I have a group that I was going to which is rare for a rural area such as ours. The models that we had a lot of them do extensive yoga and they make the best models. I haven’t gone for over a year because I got burnt out going for over 7 years. I have been thinking of it but I don’t want to lose my Saturday mornings…who knows I just might at some point. I think online atelier sites is better than nothing! I should look into that.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. dawnmarie

    Sometimes, we learn things we should not know and we can’t take back. There is truth in the idea of ignorance is bliss! My absolute all time favorite is the band Third Day.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Those are good drawings! When I just started taking an interest in painting, I rigorously worked through each of the exercises in “Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain”. Have you done these? Many of these exercises involved contour drawings of my hands, and I saw a huge improvement in my drawing skill because of it. Even today, when I am stuck somewhere I have my “models” available. Thanks for sharing your experience!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! I haven’t read the “Right Side of the Brain” book, although I remember when it was first published and how popular it became. I do have it on my “art reading” list, just haven’t worked my way down to it quite yet.

      Like

  13. I really want to encourage you to push that book to the top of your reading list. If you read the book thoroughly and work throught the exercises in a methodical, disciplined way, I am 94.78% sure you will like the improvement you see in many aspects of your art. For me, it was the foundation for everything that followed.

    Liked by 1 person

I'd Love to Hear Your Thoughts!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: