Inside the Art Studio

Yes, I’m still in the midst of a mess here in my art studio, and most likely I always will be. When our guests came for Memorial Day I made no apologies. It is what it is. They were still thrilled to visit the studio, see the artwork I have on display, and take a peek at a few works currently in progress.

All the same, I’m hoping to bring a bit of order to the chaos here, and I made a good start yesterday by getting the clutter off my desk and using it for only my “art essentials” — which at the moment include my can filled with watercolor brushes, a supply of drawing pencils, an eraser, and miscellaneous tools like scissors, Exacto knife, a letter opener, and a hole punch.

This morning I went browsing a bit for ideas on how to better organize my art studio. I not only found a few ideas, but I also came across Inside the Art Studio: A Guided Tour of 37 Artists’ Creative SpacesThe link here will take you to Amazon, and you can also find the book available through other used book sellers. It would definitely be an interesting book to have in the studio.

While the book is a bit costly, you can also virtually visit many artists’ studios online. My Modern Met will take you on a tour of 8 Famous Artists’ Studios. They explain:

By exploring artists’ studios, we can get a feel for their creative approach; from the way they chose to arrange their art supplies to the view from their desk, the details found in their surroundings help paint a picture of their practice. While most artists’ ateliers either have not survived or exist behind closed doors, some are open to the public—and most have even stayed true to the artists’ visions.

A look at Frida Kahlo’s Desk

The studios featured in this article include those of:

  • Frido Kahlo
  • Paul Cezanne
  • Barbara Hepworth
  • Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock
  • Claude Monet
  • Georgia O’Keefe
  • Auguste Rodin

And so my morning has been spent visiting other studios instead of straightening up my own. It’s been an enjoyable time, and it’s helped me understand more and more how important it is that my personal studio reflect who I am — and who I am, plain and simple, is messy and always a bit disorganized. I couldn’t work or play in a space that was too neat, too well-organized.

A studio can be many things. It’s a creative space. It’s a retreat from the rest of the world. It’s a workshop where exciting things happen. We may enjoy having a studio with our works on display for visitors to browse — and possibly buy. Or, like Gustav Klimt, we may say “No unannounced visitors allowed.”

I do love my art studio. I wish it were a bit more organized, but not too much so. I like the creative energy of artwork and colors and paints and brushes here and there. I like the atmosphere in my studio. For me, it’s a place where magic happens. It’s also a place where I can sit quietly when I need to be alone. Whether I’m ecstatic about a painting I’ve done or down-hearted about a failed art project, I can feel those emotions here in my studio. It’s my place. I think that’s the most important element in any art studio. We have to make it our own.

 

11 Comments

      1. Thanks. Doing a lot of little pencil exercises and drawing lots of objects around the house — cups, bowls, pitchers, that sort of thing. I’m drawing every day, and that is always helpful.

        Liked by 1 person

  1. LOVE YOUR EASEL! WISH I HAD ONE LIKE IT! WOW, IS THERE THE HIDDEN DRAWER OR AREA THAT CONTAINS THE BRUSHES WE DO NOT SEE IN THE POST? YOU MUST EXERCISE EXTREME SELF CONTROL! 🙂 IT IS AMAZING THE BRUSHES WE CAN COLLECT, BETWEEN WATERCOLOR & OIL BRUSHES, I HAVE MANY. HOWEVER I ALWAYS GRAVITATE TO CERTAIN FAVORITE ONES, IN BOTH MEDIA.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The photo isn’t mine. It’s the cover of the book “Inside the Artist Studio”. I wish I had a nice easel like that, too. The one I’m working on has no drawers. And yes, it’s so easy to collect LOTS of brushes. I’m finding, though, that I go back to certain ones, so I’m not buying and trying so many new ones now.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. What a lovely article and thank you for those links. I love “visiting” other studios.
    You nailed it when you write it’s the place we can feel all the feels. My studio is my safe place.
    One time my husband dropped in and complained about my choice of music. I simply said “My studio. My rules.” He got the message. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. LOL… I have a little plaque that says “My office… my rules”. I should make a more appropriate one for the studio. Yes, it’s definitely my “safe space” — whether I’m happy or sad, or just feeling like I want to be alone for any reason. I always come to my studio, and I always find myself here.

      Liked by 2 people

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